Argentina Literature

Some noble and representative voices of Argentine literature have been extinguished: L. Lugones, who was, and still remains, the master of the new generations, has disappeared and committed suicide; disappeared, even suicidal, the most vehement, the hottest, the greatest Argentine poetess, Alfonsina Storni. And Ricardo Güiraldes is also dead, the most gifted of modern storytellers, whose prose published posthumously (Xaimaca, etc.), if they do not reach his novel Don Segundo Sombra in power and beauty., still confirm the nobility and sincerity of his genius. The Argentine tradition, which recognizes its closest masters, as well as in Lugones, Roberto J. Payró, Pablo Groussac, Martín Aldao, Ricardo Rojas, Roberto Gache, Enrique Larreta, and some others, has not lost its genuine characters; but it widened in breath, it swelled in tone, while it was getting rid of some residue of provincialism, still present in some writers; so that today we have a literature that can sometimes be adventurous due to too much desire for conquest, but which is anything but poor in humanity and awareness. The Nosotros magazine, directed by Roberto F. Giusti and Alfredo Antonio Bianchi (the latter died in 1942), continued to defend Argentine and South American values ​​until 1943. But others were born in the meantime, in those years and after, which knew maintain and carry forward the positions reached; suffice it to recall Sur, directed by the writer Victoria Ocampo (essayist and author of various monographs, collected in part, in the volumes of Testimonios, the last series of which is from 1945) who, after having opened her columns with breadth and wisdom, also to illustrious writers Europeans, revealed, first, the worthy narrators of Eduardo Mallea, lyrical prose writers such as Emilio Lazcano Tegui (author, among other things, of De la elegancia mientras se duerme, 1925), poets such as Oliveiro Girondo and his wife Norah Lange (El rumbo de la rosa, 1930, and Cuadernos de infancia, National Prize 1937). Short life, but far from poor in echoes, it had another magazine in 1933: Poesía, directed by the poet Pedro Juan Vignale (Retiro, 1923; Canciones para los niños olvidados, 1929; etc.). Poesía called around him some of the youngest, but most daring poets of Argentina: Jorge Luis Borgés; Nicolás Olivari (La Musa de la Mala Pata and other collections of poems); César Tiempo (author of Argentine Sabatión and plays); Raúl Scalabrini Ortiz (El hombre que está solo y espera ; trad. ital. The man who is alone and waits, Milan 1934); Pablo Rojas Paz (also essayist and novelist: last work, Raíces del cielo, 1944); Alvaro Yunque (author of Poemas Gringos ; España, 1936; Tutearse con el peligro, 1945; etc.); Bernardo Canal Feijóo and Horacio Rava (two poets, these, from the north, from Santiago del Estero); the Chilean Pablo Neruda, the Uruguayan natives Enrique Amorím and Augusto Mario Delfino (Cuentos de Nochebuena, 1946); Arturo Marasso (Poemas, 1945; La mirada en el tiempo, essays, 1946); Ulyses Petit de Murat (awarded in 1945 for the novel El balcón hacia la muerte); Luis M. Descotte (in Diálogos, 1939 and in Los regresos, 1947); and not a few others. Meanwhile, the columns of the Sunday supplements of the Nación and of the Prensa hosted, often discovering them themselves, prose writers and poets who had not yet achieved notoriety, but who did not take long to become famous. For Argentina 2007, please check extrareference.com.

For opera we remember: Leopoldo Marechal, author of Sonetos a Sophia, national prize of 1941; Cayetano Cordova Iturburu (El viento en la bandera, poems, 1945); Francisco Luis Bernárdez, national prize of 1944 with Poemas elementales; Ricardo E. Molinari, one of the best, author of El imaginero, 1927, and many other works up to El huésped y la melancolía 1946; Ezequiel Martínez Estrada, two-time president of the Argentine Society; Horacio Rega Molina, author of La víspera del buen amor 1925, and other volumes of poetry; Roberto Ledesma, Margarita Abella Caprile, Vicente Barbieri, and many others. Without leaving aside the “elderly”: from the poets Baldomero Fernández Moreno, Enrique Banchs, Arturo Capdevila, Alberto Ghiraldo, who died in 1946, to the narrators Enrique Meradez Calzada, Arturo Cancela, Juan Carlos Dávalos, Alberto Rafael Arrieta and Alberto Gerchunoff. Among the prose writers, the most recent are also worth mentioning, such as: Juan M. Prieto, Max Dickmann, Enrique Loncán, etc. Among the theater writers, after the death of Roberto J. Payró and Pablo Groussac, who were also two excellent prose writers, we must mention the names of Leónidas Barletta, director of the Teatro del pueblo in Buenos Aires; by Arturo Cerretani, by Ulyses Petit de Murat, by Horacio Rega Molina, etc. Among the new authors of critical essays, SiglosEscuelasAuthors), Julio Noé, etc. Argentine literature and culture have made great progress in recent years, thanks also to the fact that the Argentine publishing industry – also in relation to the situation of Spanish publishing in crisis due to the civil war and that created by the Second World War – has had a grandiose development, albeit, at some point, plethoric.

Argentina Literature