Cities and Places in Venezuela

Canaima

One of the highlights of a trip to Venezuela is certainly a visit to the Canaima National Park (UNESCO World Heritage), with the highest waterfall on earth. The national park in southeastern Venezuela is also one of the largest in the world. The park is part of the Guyana Shield, the oldest geological formation on earth. The landscape is extremely varied, one encounters impenetrable jungle, hilly savannah, black water rivers and beautiful waterfalls. The flora is unique, rich in rare orchids and bromeliads. The table mountains loom in the distance, each an ecological island with very special properties. The best known is the Auyan Tepui, a 2,535 m high table mountain, which consists of canyons, towers and crevices made of sandstone and has a surface of 700 km2. From the eastern flank of the plateau, the Río Churún plunges into the depths as a Salto Angel. The Salto Angel is the highest waterfall in the world at 979 m. The waterfall got its name from James Angel, an American who flew into the Guiana highlands in a sport plane in search of gold in 1935 and discovered the waterfall. The Venezuelan President endeavors to give the waterfall its name, which the Indian people of the Pemón gave it, Kerepakupai-Merú (“Leap of the Deepest Place”). One of the highlights of the national park is a flight over the Salto Angel. who flew in a sport airplane in search of gold in the highlands of Guiana in 1935 and discovered the waterfall. The Venezuelan President endeavors to give the waterfall its name, which the Indian people of the Pemón gave it, Kerepakupai-Merú (“Leap of the Deepest Place”). One of the highlights of the national park is a flight over the Salto Angel. who flew in a sport airplane in search of gold in the highlands of Guiana in 1935 and discovered the waterfall. The Venezuelan President endeavors to give the waterfall its name, which the Indian people of the Pemón gave it, Kerepakupai-Merú (“Leap of the Deepest Place”). One of the highlights of the national park is a flight over the Salto Angel.

Merida

Merida is the tourist and university center of the Venezuelan west. There are several sights to admire around the Plaza Bolivar. Most important is the statue of the Libertador – Simon Bolivar. But also the Basilica de la Inmaculada Concepcion, which is one of the most beautiful and largest churches in Venezuela. One of the city’s attractions is the Heladeria Coromoto ice cream parlor, which has made its way into the Guinness Book of Records with more than 800 flavors. From salmon to garlic to spaghetti Bolognese, everyone will find something for their taste here. To the west, up to an altitude of 1,630 m, runs the Teleférico de Mérida, the highest cable car in the world. It starts in the center of the city and leads to the glaciated regions of the Andes, to the Pico Espajo (4,765 m).

Caracas

The capital of Venezuela was founded in 1567 and is located in a valley at an altitude of 800 – 1,000 meters, the “Basin of Chacao”, which is very fertile. The city, founded by the Spaniards, was once inhabited by Toromaimo Indians. Today it is the capital and largest city of Venezuela, as well as the industrial and cultural center of the country – 75% of all industrial companies are located here. Of the buildings from the colonial era, only the cathedral, the town hall and the San Francisco Church, a particularly beautiful example of colonial architecture, have survived. Most of the buildings from this period were destroyed in earthquakes in 1755 and 1812, so the city is largely modern. The panorama of Caracas is dominated by the impressive ‘El Avila’ massif. This can be reached via a cable car. Once at the top there is an incomparable view of Caracas and, on the other side, of Mount Galipan and the Caribbean Sea. To the north of the city is the Ávila massif, part of the outer chain of the so-called central branch of the Venezuelan coastal cordillera. Countless wonderful hiking trails beckon in the El Ávila National Park.

Ciudad Bolivar

Ciudad Bolivar is the capital of the state of Bolívar, which makes up over a quarter of the area of ​​Venezuela. The historic old town is a major tourist attraction, characterized by houses and public buildings from the colonial era. The city is known as a starting point for expeditions on the Orinoco. There are hikes and boat trips in untouched jungle areas. In the areas there are only small Indian villages along the river, where you can stop to get to know the locals better. In the jungle you can discover a wide variety of plants such as orchids, bromeliads, the quinine tree and the vanillin plant. The viewpoints are special, such as B. an unusually large jungle tree or a huge slab of rock, which offer a wonderful view over the dark green, untouched jungle carpet and the course of the river. In the flooded area of ​​the Caura there are also lagoons where alligators frolic, which can normally be observed on the banks without any problems.

Amazon region

Probably the most mysterious area of ​​the country is the Amazon. Here, in the still largely undeveloped jungle, you will find an unimaginable number of rare plant species, from ferns and colorful orchids to 200-meter-long lianas and huge trees. This region, in which the Orinoco River rises, is extremely sparsely populated, only a few Indian tribes live here. It is a very special experience to make your way through the dense, extremely humid jungle.

Isla Magarita

Isla Margarita combines endless dream beaches, national parks, culture, history in the form of castles and fortresses as well as the opportunity for sporting activities on water and on land with the typical South American way of life.

Los Llanos

The Llanos, a seemingly endless plain of pastures and steppe crossed by rivers, extend over almost a third of the total area of ​​the country. They reach from the Andes to the southeast of the country and despite their enormous extent they were only opened up for tourism less than 20 years ago, but this cannot be due to the lack of attractiveness of this area: the wide plains are perfect for viewing numerous rare animals to watch how countless fish species, among them piranhas, but also turtles, caimans, jaguars, monkeys, capybaras and an incredible number of different bird species. The Llanos know two seasons: during the drought it is extremely dry here, while in the rainy season the area is literally flooded and comes to life again.

Los Roques Archipelago

The truly paradisiacal Los Roques Archipelago, which is completely protected, is the perfect place to relax, swim and snorkel with its snow-white beaches, turquoise-blue water, colorful fish and coral reefs.

Orinoco Delta

In the east of the country lies the Orinoco Delta, the mouth of the most important river in Venezuela. The more than 300 river arms branch out here over an area of ​​24,000 square kilometers, creating countless islands and sandbanks that can only be explored by boat. The warm and humid climate of the tropics has created a unique biotope with an incredible variety of animals and plants. Some native tribes also still live here in traditional stilt houses. Visit nexticle.net for cultural travel in south America.

Gran Sabana

The landscape of the Gran Sabana in the Venezuelan southeast has a completely different face. The savannah, covered by moriche palms, is bordered by over 100 rugged, majestic table mountains. In between, small forests are grouped around larger and smaller waterfalls. The Quebrada de Jaspe waterfall is an unforgettable, fairytale sight. Its river bed is covered with countless colorful semi-precious stones and with the right sunlight it shimmers, shines and glitters in all colors of the rainbow.

Cities and Places in Venezuela