Ecuador Money

Health care

Vaccinations

Vaccination needed receipt required
Eat Drink 5
malaria 4
Typhoid & Polio 3
cholera 2
yellow fever 1

Overview

The medical care in the country in the larger cities can be compared to that in Europe. In rural areas, however, it is often problematic in terms of technology, equipment and/or hygiene. Taking out travel health insurance with return travel insurance is strongly recommended. However, it is pointed out that emergency medical treatment in private clinics is usually only available against advance payment or proof of sufficient creditworthiness (credit card coverage of €5,000 recommended). An individual first-aid kit should be taken with you and protected according to the temperatures on the way. Check directoryaah for more information.

Notes vaccinations

[1] Ecuador is considered a country with yellow fever infection areas (provinces of Morona-Santiago, Napo, Orellana, Pastaza, Sucumbios and Zamora-Chinchipe). Therefore, regardless of country regulations, the WHO strongly recommends vaccination against yellow fever, especially when traveling outside urban areas and in the rainforest. Vaccination strongly recommended when traveling to the eastern provinces. A vaccination certificate against yellow fever is required for all travelers who plan to enter the country within 6 days of staying in an infected area designated by the WHO and who are over one year old. Excluded are travelers who have not left the transit area in the infected areas and transit travelers who do not leave the airport in Ecuador. [2] A vaccination certificate against cholera is not an entry requirement, but there is a risk of infection, especially in the provinces: Guayas, Imbabura, Los Rios, Manabi. To protect oneself, one should practice careful drinking water and food hygiene. Since the effectiveness of the vaccination is disputed, it is advisable to seek medical advice in good time before you travel. Contrary to official regulations, a cholera vaccination may occasionally be required, especially when arriving from a country with cholera or when entering outside of international airports. [3] Typhoid can occur, poliomyelitis cannot. Typhoid vaccination is recommended for backpacking and long-term stays. [4] Malaria risk all year round in areas below 1500 m. High risk in the coastal provinces of Esmeraldas, Manabí, Guayas and El Oro in the west and in the eastern parts of the Amazon provinces of Sucumbíos, Napo and Pastaza. Medium risk in western Loja, Los Ríos and Cotopaxi provinces and western lowlands of Sucumbíos, Napo, Pastaza and Morona Santiago. Little or no risk in other parts of the country, cities and on the Galapagos Islands. Resistance to chloroquine has been reported for the more dangerous form Plasmodium falciparum (21%). [5] Nationwide there is an increased risk of infection for various infectious diseases (e.g. typhus, bacterial dysentery, amoebic dysentery, lambliasis, worm diseases), which are transmitted through contaminated food or drinks. Water should generally either be boiled or otherwise sterilized before it is used for drinking, brushing teeth and making ice cubes, or it should be bought packaged. When buying bottled water, care should be taken to ensure that the original packaging is unopened. Milk is not pasteurized outside of urban areas and should be boiled. It is best to avoid dairy products made from unboiled milk. Meat and fish dishes should only be well cooked and served hot. Pork, raw salads and mayonnaise are also not always safe. Vegetables should be boiled and fruits should be peeled. Outside of urban areas, milk is unpasteurized and should be boiled. It is best to avoid dairy products made from unboiled milk. Meat and fish dishes should only be well cooked and served hot. Pork, raw salads and mayonnaise are also not always safe. Vegetables should be boiled and fruits should be peeled. Outside of urban areas, milk is unpasteurized and should be boiled. It is best to avoid dairy products made from unboiled milk. Meat and fish dishes should only be well cooked and served hot. Pork, raw salads and mayonnaise are also not always safe. Vegetables should be boiled and fruits should be peeled.

Other risks

Chagas disease, which is transmitted by assassin bugs, has a low risk of infection in slums. Travelers who stay in simple huts and in the open air are recommended to use mosquito nets to protect them from insects. Dengue fever, transmitted by mosquitoes, occurs during the rainy season (November to June) in Laja, Guayas and Esmeraldas provinces. An effective insect repellent is recommended. Filariasis caused by insects occurs in isolated herds in the northwest (Esmeraldas). Travelers reduce the risk of transmission if they use an effective insect repellent. Nationwide there is an increased risk of infection with hepatitis A. Vaccination against hepatitis A is recommended. Hepatitis B and E occur. Vaccination against hepatitis B should be given during longer stays and close contact with the local population, as well as for children and young people in general. Leishmaniasis, transmitted by whiteflies, occurs nationwide. Protection is offered by skin-covering clothes and insect repellents. Plague cases have been reported from Chimborazo province. Protection against rats and fleas through safe sleeping places and more frequent linen changes as well as keeping away those who are already sick reduce the risk of infection. If you work in areas affected by the plague, it is advisable to take antibiotics prophylactically. rabies occurs. Carriers include dogs, cats, forest animals and bats. For backpackers, kids, Vaccination is recommended for occupational risk groups and for longer stays. In the event of a bite, seek medical attention as soon as possible. Cases of human rabies have been reported in the province of Morona Santiago (Amazon region). Bats are likely to be carriers. Anyone traveling to this region, rarely visited by tourists, should keep their windows closed at night and consider getting vaccinated. HIV/AIDS is a problem worldwide and a great danger for everyone who takes the risk of infection: unprotected sexual contact, unclean syringes or cannulas and blood transfusions can pose a significant health risk. The Zika virus is transmitted to humans by mosquitoes. Symptoms include fever, joint pain and conjunctivitis. The infection often goes unnoticed or only has mild symptoms. The isolated deaths documented so far were mainly related to other pre-existing conditions. The Federal Foreign Office advises pregnant women against non-essential travel to areas with current Zika outbreaks because the virus is suspected of causing microcephaly in the unborn child. There is neither a vaccination nor a medicinal prophylaxis. Consistent compliance with personal mosquito protection measures is recommended. The Federal Foreign Office advises pregnant women against non-essential travel to areas with current Zika outbreaks because the virus is suspected of causing microcephaly in the unborn child. There is neither a vaccination nor a medicinal prophylaxis. Consistent compliance with personal mosquito protection measures is recommended. The Federal Foreign Office advises pregnant women against non-essential travel to areas with current Zika outbreaks because the virus is suspected of causing microcephaly in the unborn child. There is neither a vaccination nor a medicinal prophylaxis. Consistent compliance with personal mosquito protection measures is recommended.

Money

Currency

1 US dollar = 100 cents. Currency code: US$, USD (ISO code). Banknotes come in denominations of US$100, 50, 20, 10, 5, 2 and 1. The $2 bill is so rare that ATMs won’t dispense it. It is a popular collector’s item that many have never held in their hands because of its rarity. Coins come in denominations of $1, 50, 25, 10, 5 and 1 cent. In addition to the dollar coins, the centavo coins are also in circulation, these are given out as change and correspond in value to the dollar cent. Attention: 50 and 100 US$ banknotes are currently not accepted in banks and shops because many counterfeit banknotes are in circulation.

Credit cards

Mastercard, Visa and Diners Club are usually accepted in large shops, restaurants and hotels. However, there are currently repeated difficulties with withdrawing cash from ATMs with a credit card and paying with credit cards in shops. Details from the issuer of the relevant credit card.

ATMs

Bank cards The Girocard (formerly EC card) with the Cirrus, Plus or Maestro symbol is accepted worldwide. It can be used at ATMs with the Cirrus, Plus or Maestro symbol. Note: Cash withdrawals from ATMs with bank debit cards are currently not fully functional in Ecuador. ATMs in Ecuador should only be used during business hours and should be accompanied if possible. To be on the safe side, travelers should have an alternative supply of money, such as a credit card and cash, in addition to their bank customer card. Further information from banks and credit institutes. Attention: Travelers who want to pay with their bank customer card abroad and withdraw money,

Travelers cheques

Travelers checks are no longer accepted in Ecuador.

Bank opening hours

  1. General Mon-Fri 09.00-16.00/18.00, z. T. Sat mornings

Foreign exchange regulations

The import and export of local currency and foreign currencies is unlimited, sums from an equivalent value of US$ 10,000 must be declared.

Currency Exchange

US dollars are recommended. Money can be exchanged at banks and exchange offices (casas de cambio). Changing money outside of the cities can be difficult. The exchange fee varies between 1% and 4%, one should inquire before exchanging. “Western Union” with a dense network of sales offices and partners (100 partners in Quito) is available for money transfers.

Currencies

Code Symbol Exchange rates (no guarantee)
USD U.S$ 1 EUR = 1.04 US$
1 CHF = 1.24 US$
1 USD = 1.00 US$

Ecuador Money