Indonesia Money

Health care

Vaccinations

Vaccination needed receipt required
yellow fever 1
cholera 2
Typhoid & Polio Yes
malaria 3
Eat Drink

Overview

Medical care is insufficient, especially outside of the larger cities, and cannot be compared with that in Europe. It is often technically, apparatus-related and/or hygienically problematic. Treatment costs for doctor visits or hospital stays must be paid immediately on site. There is often a lack of European-trained doctors who speak English or French. If possible, travel or tropical medicine advice should be sought before the trip. Taking out travel health insurance and repatriation insurance is strongly recommended. An individual first-aid kit should be taken with you and protected according to the temperatures on the way. Check directoryaah for more information.

Notes vaccinations

[1] A vaccination certificate against yellow fever is required for travelers who plan to enter the country within six days of staying in an infected area designated by the WHO. Excluded are travelers who have not left the transit area in the infected areas and transit passengers in Indonesia who do not leave the transit area. [2] A certificate of vaccination against cholera is not an entry requirement, but there is a risk of infection in isolated cases. Since the effectiveness of the vaccination is disputed, it is advisable to seek medical advice in good time before you travel. [3] Malaria is a serious public health problem in Indonesia. There is a risk of malaria throughout the country, particularly in Lombok, West Papua (Irian Jaya) and on the island of Sumba. A low risk lies in Kalimantan (Borneo), the islands off the west coast of Sumatra, East Nusa Tenggara (islands from Flores to Timur) and the Moluccas archipelago. Bali, Sumatra, Java, Sulawesi, West Nusa Tenggara (Islands from Lombok to Sumbawa) have minimal risk. The predominant more dangerous form Plasmodium falciparum is said to be highly resistant to chloroquine and largely resistant to sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine. The less dangerous form Plasmodium vivax has been reported on Irian Jaya, which is also said to be resistant to chloroquine. Good mosquito repellent is essential and – after medical consultation – medicinal malaria prophylaxis is recommended.

Food and drink

Due to the risk of possible infections, careful drinking water and food hygiene must be ensured. Water should generally either be boiled or otherwise sterilized or bought packaged before drinking, brushing your teeth and making ice cubes. When buying packaged water, you should make sure that the original packaging has not been opened. Milk is usually not pasteurized and should also be boiled before use. Only mix milk powder or canned milk with sterile water. Dairy products made from unboiled milk should be avoided. Meat and fish dishes should only be eaten hot and well cooked. Pork, mayonnaise and raw salads should be avoided. Vegetables should be boiled and fruits should be peeled. Throughout the country, travelers should avoid alcoholic beverages of unclear origin, especially spirits and mixed spirits, and only consume originally sealed, industrially manufactured products. At risk are methanol-contaminated (“adulterated”) beverages containing home-made schnapps, which are offered to tourists as a local specialty or used as an ingredient in cocktails. Avoid spirits and mixed spirit drinks in particular, and only consume originally sealed, industrially manufactured products. At risk are methanol-contaminated (“adulterated”) beverages containing home-made schnapps, which are offered to tourists as a local specialty or used as an ingredient in cocktails. Avoid spirits and mixed spirit drinks in particular, and only consume originally sealed, industrially manufactured products. At risk are methanol-contaminated (“adulterated”) beverages containing home-made schnapps, which are offered to tourists as a local specialty or used as an ingredient in cocktails.

Other risks

The standard vaccinations for children and adults recommended by the Robert Koch Institute (including against tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis (whooping cough), mumps, measles, rubella, pneumococci, poliomyelitis and influenza) should be refreshed before the trip if necessary. Schistosomiasis pathogens can occur in some ponds and rivers in Central Sulawesi, possibly also in Central Java. Swimming and wading in inland waters in these regions should therefore be avoided. Well maintained swimming pools with chlorinated water are safe. The mosquito-borne viral disease Chikungunya (CHIC) occurs throughout the country throughout the year, primarily in Java, but also in Borneo and the Riau Islands. Skin-covering clothing and insect repellents offer effective protection. Mosquito-borne dengue fever is nationwide and year-round, with the highest incidence from October through March. An effective insect repellent is recommended. Hepatitis A and hepatitis B occur nationwide. A hepatitis A vaccination is generally recommended. Vaccination against hepatitis B should be given during longer stays and close contact with the local population, as well as for children and young people in general. HIV/AIDS is a danger for everyone who takes the risk of infection: unprotected sexual contact, tattoos, unclean syringes or cannulas and blood transfusions can pose a significant health risk. There is a low risk of contracting Japanese encephalitis from September to March, especially in rural areas. Vaccination should be considered for long-term stays in affected areas. Rabies occurs nationwide. Carriers include dogs, cats, forest animals and bats. Vaccination is recommended for backpackers, children, occupational risk groups and for longer stays. In the event of a bite, seek medical attention as soon as possible. Precautionary vaccination against rabies is recommended for travelers visiting Indonesian islands such as Bali. Tuberculosis occurs nationwide. Infection occurs from person to person via droplet infection. The Zika virus is transmitted to humans by mosquitoes. Symptoms include fever, Joint pain and conjunctivitis. The infection often goes unnoticed or only has mild symptoms. The isolated deaths documented so far were mainly related to other pre-existing conditions. The virus can cause microcephaly in the unborn child. There is neither a vaccination nor a medicinal prophylaxis. Consistent compliance with personal mosquito protection measures is recommended. isolated deaths were mainly related to other pre-existing conditions. The virus can cause microcephaly in the unborn child. There is neither a vaccination nor a medicinal prophylaxis. Consistent compliance with personal mosquito protection measures is recommended. isolated deaths were mainly related to other pre-existing conditions. The virus can cause microcephaly in the unborn child. There is neither a vaccination nor a medicinal prophylaxis. Consistent compliance with personal mosquito protection measures is recommended.

bird flu

The risk of infection is very low, but there have been isolated cases in the past. It is therefore recommended to stay away from poultry markets.

Health certificate

When applying for a visa and entering the country, neither a health certificate nor an HIV test is required. However, a positive HIV test obtained in the country must be reported to the health authority. Occasionally, a negative HIV test is required when renewing a residency permit.

Money

Currency

Indonesian rupiah. Currency code: Rp, IDR (ISO code). Banknotes are available in denominations of 100,000, 50,000, 20,000, 10,000, 5,000, 2,000 and 1,000 cents. Coins in denominations of 1000, 500, 200, 100 and 50 cents. 50rp coins are no longer used in practice.

Credit cards

American Express, Mastercard, Diners Club and Visa are accepted by major hotels, restaurants and travel agencies in Jakarta and tourist areas. Details from the issuer of the relevant credit card.

ATMs

Girocard The Girocard (formerly ec card) with the Cirrus, Plus or Maestro symbol is accepted worldwide. It can be used at ATMs with the Cirrus, Plus or Maestro symbol. In sparsely populated areas, however, there are few or no ATMs. Attention: Travelers who want to pay with their bank customer card abroad and withdraw money should find out from their bank about the possibility of using their card before starting their journey.

Travelers cheques

Traveller’s checks are no longer accepted in Indonesia.

Bank opening hours

Mon-Fri 08.30-14.00/15.00, some banks also Sat 09.30-12.30.

Foreign exchange regulations

No import or export restrictions for foreign currencies. The import of foreign currencies in the form of cash and other means of payment must be declared from an amount equivalent to Rp 100 million (approx. EUR 1,174,206) and violations of this rule can result in high fines. A permit from the Indonesian Central Bank is required for the export of foreign currency worth more than Rp 100 million. Import and export of the national currency up to Rp 5 million. The national currency can be exchanged back when leaving the country if exchange receipts are available.

Currency Exchange

In Jakarta, money can be exchanged at international banks, hotels and authorized exchange offices. In the larger tourist centers there is no problem exchanging major currencies, in more remote areas it is advisable to carry cash in small denominations. Euros are recommended because this currency is the most widely accepted alongside the US dollar. The current exchange rates are published daily in the newspapers.

Currencies

Code Symbol Exchange rates (no guarantee)
IDR Rp 1 EUR = Rp 14015.00
1 CHF = Rp 16659.00
1 USD = Rp 13433.00

Indonesia Money