New York City Road Network

According to ejiaxing, New York or New York City in full is the largest city in the United States. The metropolitan area of ​​New York is one of the largest metropolitan areas in the world. The city has 8,467,000 inhabitants, and an agglomeration of 19,768,000 inhabitants (2021). The city consists of 5 so-called boroughs, which all consist of a county. The 5 boroughs are The Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens and Staten Island. The city is also the most densely populated with 10,502 inhabitants per square kilometer. However, the urban area is not the most densely populated in the country. This is because the suburbs are less populated than the suburbs of Los Angeles.

History of the highway network

The oldest grade separated road in the world, the Long Island Motor Parkway is located just outside of New York and opened to traffic in 1908. The region is characterized by some major bridges, some of which were de facto highways before the connecting infrastructure was also developed as highways. The Bronx River Parkway was the first 4-lane grade separations road, the first section of which opened in 1922. In the 1920s and 1930s, parkways were outside New York, particularly in Westchester County and Long Island. Its design requirements evolved over that time, gradually moving from 1×4 lanes to split lanes, to grade separations, and eventually the elimination of left turners, allowing the parkways to mature in design throughout the 1930s, eventually evolving into the first modern motorways in the second half of the 1930s. It is difficult to say exactly what the first modern highway is, as the Merritt Parkway is often mentioned.

In the 1930s, several major bridges and tunnels were constructed, as well as an extensive network of parkways, particularly on Long Island and the Hudson Valley. During the Second World War, the construction of highways stagnated, especially in the period 1941-1945. But some highways opened in the 1940s. In the early 1950s, freight traffic increased to such an extent that the parkways, with their low headroom and intended use, were unsuitable for this, prompting a new wave of expressways, which were part Interstate Highways from 1956. The heyday of New York highway construction was in the 1950s and 1960s. Construction declined sharply in the 1970s to almost a standstill. Only in New Jersey From that time on, new highways were built on some scale, often as Interstate Highways.

Main road network

The metropolitan area of New York City in the states of New York and New Jersey.

New York has one of the first highway networks in the world, well before the Interstate Highway system. The first fast roads were in the form of Parkways was built around 1910. This Parkway system was expanded considerably from the 1920s and 1930s. The Parkways were intended for New Yorkers to drive recreationally. The rapid growth of the suburbs made these Parkways busy commuter routes. Many Parkways and Expressways in and around New York are seriously outdated. Freight traffic is not allowed on almost all Parkways due to the bridges that are too low. The Parkways usually had 2×2 or 2×3 lanes, and have never been expanded or improved since. A stark contrast is New Jersey, which has adapted its highways to the population growth. In New York, Long Island and the New York suburbs, virtually no highway is wider than 2×3 lanes, but in New Jersey, 2×5 to 20 lanes are more common, especially on toll roads.

In total, the New York metropolitan area has 58 different highways, many of which are Parkways. In New York and Long Island, these are no wider than 2×3 lanes. New Jersey has a less dense network of Parkways. However, these are newer than in New York and Long Island.

Radiating highways

Although the region has a lot of different highways, there are a number of highways that have a clear through character. Chief among these is Interstate 95, which runs from the Washington / Philadelphia area toward Providence / Boston. To the north is Interstate 87, which runs to the state capital, Albany, and the Canadian city of Montreal. Two main highways run west, Interstate 80 passing through northern Pennsylvania toward Cleveland / Chicago runs, and the parallel Interstate 78, which connects the city of Allentown and Harrisburg in central Pennsylvania to New York a little more south. As a tangential connection, the Garden State Parkway runs along the west side of the metropolitan area from south to north, but it performs less of a through function, but connects the urbanized coast of New Jersey with the western suburbs of New York. Although Long Island is eccentric from the rest of the region and actually belongs to the New York metropolitan area, a clear main axis can be distinguished, this is Interstate 495.

Overview Expressways

New York City
Road name length first opening last opening max AADT 2008
Major Deegan Expressway 13 km 1939 1956 134,000
Trans-Manhattan Expressway 1 km 1962 1962 289,000
Cross Bronx Expressway 11 km 1955 1963 184,000
Staten Island Expressway 12 km 1964 1964 190,000
Gowanus Expressway 9 km 1941 1964 190,000
Brooklyn-Queens Expressway 17 km 1950 1964 168,000
Bruckner Expressway 7 km 1962 1972 166,000
Clearview Expressway 15 km 1960 1963 111,000
Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel 3 km 1950 1950 52,000
Long Island Expressway 114 km 1940 1960 184,000
Van Wyck Expressway 23 km 1939 1963 155,000
Throgs Neck Expressway 2 km 1961 1961
Sheridan Expressway 2 km 1962 1962
Prospect Expressway 3 km 1960 1962 106,000
Nassau Expressway 9 km 1971 1990 51,000
Long Island
Road name length first opening last opening max AADT 2008
Long Island Expressway 114 km 1958 1972 223,000
Sunrise Highway 140 km 145,000
Seaford-Oyster Bay Expressway 17 km 1962 1969 104,000
Babylon-Northport Expressway 3 km 1970 1970 29,000
Hudson Valley
Road name length first opening last opening max AADT 2008
New York State Thruway 58 km 1954 1956 138,000
New England Thruway 24 km 1958 1958 140,000
Interstate 287 50 km 1955 1960 147,000
Interstate 684 46 km 1968 1974 85,000
New Jersey
Road name length first opening last opening max AADT 2008
Interstate 78 109 km 1927 1977 147,000
Interstate 80 110 km 1961 1971 145,000
New Jersey Turnpike 125 km 1951 1952 297,000
Interstate 280 28 km 1949 1980 118,000
Interstate 287 109 km 1960 1993 176,000
Garden State Parkway 277 km 1950 1957 240,000
State Route 3 17 km 1949 1949 151,000
State Route 4 17 km 1930 1933 135,000
State Route 19 5 km 1969 1971 43,000
State Route 21 23 km 1958 2000 60,000
State Route 81 2 km 1979 1982 33,000
State Route 208 16 km 1969 1980 85,000
State Route 495 6 km 1937 1957 121,000

Parkways overview

New York City
Road name length first opening last opening max AADT 2008
Belt Parkway 41 km 1940 1941 188,000
Bronx River Parkway 31 km 1922 1951 136,000
Franklin D. Roosevelt Drive 15 km 1934 1966 180,000
Grand Central Parkway 24 km 1933 1936 263,000
Harlem River Drive 7 km 1947 1964 98,000
Henry Hudson Parkway 18 km 1936 1937 138,000
Hutchinson River Parkway 30 km 1928 1941 116,000
Jackie Robinson Parkway 8 km 1935 1935 94,000
Korean War Veterans Parkway 7 km 1972 1972 81,000
Mosholu Parkway 5 km 1937 1937 49,000
Long Island
Road name length first opening last opening max AADT 2008
Heckscher State Parkway 13 km 1961 1962 136,000
Walk Parkway 4 km 27,000
Meadowbrook State Parkway 20 km 1934 1956 144,000
Northern State Parkway 46 km 1933 1965 190,000
Robert Moses Causeway 13 km 1953 1964 43,000
Sagtikos State Parkway 8 km 1952 1952 85,000
Southern State Parkway 41 km 1927 1949 223,000
Sunken Meadow State Parkway 10 km 1957 1957 66,000
Wantagh State Parkway 21 km 1929 1938 73,000
Hudson Valley
Road name length first opening last opening max AADT 2008
Briarcliff-Peekskill Parkway 29 km 1933 1933 56,000
Cross County Parkway 7 km 1932 1932 147,000
Merritt Parkway 60 km 1938 1940 70,000
Palisades Interstate Parkway 62 km 1947 1957 83,000
Saw Mill River Parkway 48 km 1926 1954 89,000
Sprain Brook Parkway 20 km 1961 1980 105,000
Taconic State Parkway 168 km 1932 1963 113,000

Toll roads

A motorist in the New York metropolitan area cannot escape (hefty) tolls. Virtually all bridges and tunnels have tolls, and it’s impossible to get off Long Island without paying tolls. Many bridges are seriously outdated, and the tunnels even more so.

Toll bridges and tunnels, toll rates and exchange rate August 2013:

Name Connects Toll costs (car)
Henry Hudson Bridge (Henry Hudson Parkway) Manhattan – The Bronx $5 / €3.75
George Washington Bridge (Interstate 95) Manhattan – Fort Lee $13/€9.80
Lincoln Tunnel (SR-495) Manhattan – Union City $13/€9.80
Holland Tunnel (Interstate 78) Manhattan – Jersey City $13/€9.80
Bayonne Bridge (SR-440) Staten Island – Bayonne $13/€9.80
Goethals Bridge (Interstate 278) Staten Island – Elizabeth $13/€9.80
Outerbridge Crossing (SR-440) Staten Island – Perth Amboy $13/€9.80
Verrazano Narrows Bridge (Interstate 278) Staten Island – Brooklyn $15/€11.30
Brooklyn–Battery Tunnel (Interstate 478) Manhattan – Brooklyn $7.50 / €5.65
Queens–Midtown Tunnel (Interstate 495) Manhattan – Queens $7.50 / €5.65
Robert F. Kennedy Bridge (Interstate 278) Manhattan – The Bronx – Queens $7.50 / €5.65
Bronx–Whitestone Bridge (Interstate 678) Queens – The Bronx $7.50 / €5.65
Throgs Neck Bridge (Interstate 295) Queens – The Bronx $7.50 / €5.65
Tappan Zee Bridge (Interstate 87) Tarrytown – Nyack $5 / €3.75

The toll is usually levied in one direction. A typical working day costs a commuter between 7.50 and 13 dollars in toll costs. This is $3,000 a year.

There are also two toll roads:

  • Garden State Parkway
  • New Jersey Turnpike (I-95)

Other river crossings

The Brooklyn Bridge.

The Verrazano Narrows Bridge.

The George Washington Bridge.

Name From Unpleasant
Broadway Bridge Manhattan Bronx
207th Street Bridge Manhattan Bronx
Washington Bridge Manhattan Bronx
Alexander Hamilton Bridge (I-95) Manhattan Bronx
Macombs Dam Bridge Manhattan Bronx
145th Street Bridge Manhattan Bronx
Madison Avenue Bridge Manhattan Bronx
3rd Avenue Bridge Manhattan Bronx
Willis Avenue Bridge Manhattan Bronx
Queensboro Bridge Manhattan Queens
Williamsburg Bridge Manhattan Brooklyn
Manhattan Bridge Manhattan Brooklyn
Brooklyn Bridge Manhattan Brooklyn
Kosciuszko Bridge (I-278) Brooklyn Queens
JJ Bryne Memorial Bridge Brooklyn Queens
Pulaski Bridge Brooklyn Queens
Newark Bay Bridge (I-78) Newark Jersey City

New York City Road Network