Sudan Money

Health care

Vaccinations

Vaccination needed receipt required
Eat Drink
malaria 3
Typhoid & Polio Yes
cholera 2
yellow fever 1

Overview

Medical care cannot be compared to that in Europe and is often problematic in terms of technology, equipment or hygiene. There is often a lack of European-trained doctors who speak English or French. Sufficient, worldwide valid health insurance coverage and reliable travel insurance are therefore strongly recommended. An individual first-aid kit should be taken with you and protected according to the temperatures on the way. Check findjobdescriptions for more information.

Notes vaccinations

[1] A vaccination certificate against yellow fever is required for all travelers who plan to enter the country within six days of being in the infected areas designated by the WHO and who are over nine months old. Exceptions are transit travelers who do not leave the airport in Sudan. A yellow fever vaccination certificate may be required upon exiting Sudan. In Sudan, the territory south of the 15th parallel is considered a yellow fever infection area. Therefore, regardless of country regulations, WHO strongly recommends vaccination for all travelers to yellow fever infected areas. [2] A certificate of vaccination against cholera is required of all travelers who want to enter within six days of staying in the infection areas designated by the WHO. There is a risk of cholera infection. Since the effectiveness of the vaccination is disputed, it is advisable to seek medical advice in good time before you travel. To protect yourself, you should practice careful drinking water and food hygiene. Vaccination is recommended in some cases, for example in relief operations. [3] There is a high risk of malaria all year round in the southern and central parts of the country. In the north of the country and on the Red Sea coast, the risk of infection is seasonal and low. Khartoum and Port Sudan are considered malaria-free. The predominant more dangerous form Plasmodium falciparum is said to be highly resistant to chloroquine.

Food and drink

Due to the risk of possible infections, careful drinking water and food hygiene must be ensured. Water should generally either be boiled or otherwise sterilized before drinking, brushing your teeth and making ice cubes, or it should be bought packaged. When buying packaged water, you should make sure that the original packaging has not been opened. Milk is usually not pasteurized and should also be boiled. Only mix dry and canned milk with sterile water. Avoid dairy products made from unboiled milk. Meat and fish dishes should only be well cooked and served hot. Eating raw salads and mayonnaise should be avoided.

Other risks

The standard vaccinations for children and adults recommended by the Robert Koch Institute (including against tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis (whooping cough), mumps, measles, rubella, pneumococci and influenza) should be refreshed before the trip if necessary. Schistosomiasis pathogens are found nationwide in ponds and rivers, especially in the Nile Delta and in the southern provinces. Swimming and wading in inland waters should therefore be avoided. Well maintained swimming pools with chlorinated water are safe. Dengue fever, transmitted by mosquitoes, occurs nationwide. An effective insect repellent is recommended. Filariasis caused by insects also occurs nationwide. Travelers reduce the risk of transmission, if you use an effective insect repellent. Typhus occurs mainly in the south. The fever is caused by clothes lice. To protect yourself, you should practice regular body and clothing hygiene. Vaccination should only be considered in rare cases. Hepatitis A and E as well as hepatitis B occur nationwide. A hepatitis A vaccination is generally recommended. Vaccination against hepatitis B should be given during longer stays and close contact with the local population, as well as for children and young people in general. HIV/AIDS is a great danger for everyone who takes the risk of infection: sexual contact, unclean syringes or cannulas and blood transfusions can pose a significant health risk. Truck drivers bound for Equatorial Province can be tested for HIV before continuing on to Juba. Leishmaniasis, transmitted by whiteflies, occurs nationwide. Protection is offered by skin-covering clothes and insect repellents. Epidemic-like outbreaks of meningococcal meningitis can occur in rural areas, especially in the south, from December to May. To protect yourself, you should get vaccinated and avoid large crowds. The sleeping sickness, transmitted by diurnal tse tse flies, occurs mainly in the south of the country. Appropriate clothing provides protection. Rabies occurs nationwide. Carriers include stray dogs, cats, forest animals and bats. Vaccination is recommended for travelers in case of particular exposure. In the event of a bite, seek medical attention as soon as possible. Tuberculosis occurs. Vaccination is recommended in cases of particular exposure. Tick ​​bite fever occurs mainly in the south. Protective measures are skin-covering clothing, insect repellent and body checks for ticks after staying in grassy and savannah landscapes. In all tropical countries there are a number of poisonous animals whose bites or stings can cause serious bodily harm or death. You should therefore keep your distance from snakes, scorpions, brightly colored insects and spiders. Never reach under leaves, in burrows or in stone crevices. Insect repellent and body check for ticks after staying in grassy and savannah landscapes. In all tropical countries there are a number of poisonous animals whose bites or stings can cause serious bodily harm or death. You should therefore keep your distance from snakes, scorpions, brightly colored insects and spiders. Never reach under leaves, in burrows or in stone crevices. Insect repellent and body check for ticks after staying in grassy and savannah landscapes. In all tropical countries there are a number of poisonous animals whose bites or stings can cause serious bodily harm or death. You should therefore keep your distance from snakes, scorpions, brightly colored insects and spiders. Never reach under leaves, in burrows or in stone crevices. You should therefore keep your distance from snakes, scorpions, brightly colored insects and spiders. Never reach under leaves, in burrows or in stone crevices. You should therefore keep your distance from snakes, scorpions, brightly colored insects and spiders. Never reach under leaves, in burrows or in stone crevices.

Health certificate

A negative HIV test may be required upon entry and is required of all persons wishing to stay in Sudan for more than 90 days.

Money

Currency

1 (new) Sudanese pound = 100 piasters. Currency code: SDG (ISO code). Banknotes come in denominations of 50, 20, 10, 5, 2 and 1 SDG. Coins are in denominations of 50, 20, 10, 5 and 1 piaster. The (new) Sudanese pound replaced the Sudanese dinar.

Credit cards

Not currently accepted.

ATMs

Bank cards Foreign bank cards of any kind are not accepted by Sudanese ATMs.

Travelers cheques

Travelers checks are not accepted in Sudan.

Bank opening hours

Sat-Thu 08.00-14.00.

Foreign exchange regulations

No import and export restrictions for foreign currencies, declaration obligation for sums from an equivalent value of US$ 3,000. The import and export of local currency is not permitted.

Currency Exchange

Penalties for exchanging money on the black market are severe. Money should only be exchanged at official exchange offices or in banks and receipts should be kept. It is advisable to take US dollars or euros with you in cash (only US dollars outside of the capital). US dollar bills must be printed after 2003 or they will not be accepted.

Currencies

Code Symbol Exchange rates (no guarantee)
SDG

Sudan Money