Tunisia Agriculture and Breeding

By | December 14, 2021

Like the other countries of minor Africa, Tunisia is a predominantly agricultural and pastoral country but also rich in substantial mineral resources (phosphates). The main resource, however, is made up of agriculture, whose income amounts to 4/5 of total production. After deducting the unproductive area, which accounts for 28% of the total area, more than half (50.5%) is represented by productive but not cultivated lands, 1/3 (2,934,000 ha.) By arable land, 1.1% (100,000 hectares) from natural meadows and pastures, 4.4% (400,000 ha.) From tree or arborescent crops and 11.28% (1,016,000 ha.) From woods and forests. About half of the arable land (45.8%) is cultivated with cereals, of which wheat occupies the first place. The cultivation of wheat, which before the occupation

The particularly cultivated species is that of durum wheat, the production of which in recent years has been around 2 million quintals, to which about 600,000 quintals must be added. of soft wheat. The overall average of the decade 1922-1931 was about 2,800,000 quintals, on an area of ​​660,000 ha., Which corresponds to a unitary yield of just 4 quintals per ha., Less than 1/3 of the average unitary yield. of Italy, while as an absolute value it would represent just half of the production of Tuscany alone. To the cultivation of wheat, which is largely exported, we must add that of barley, whose product is around 1.600.000 q. and which constitutes the main basis of the indigenous diet. The cultivation of oats, corn, sorghum, of legumes and potatoes. Among the industrial plants are cultivated flax (average production about 9000 q.) And tobacco (5000 q.). But the most developed agricultural crops are trees and shrubs, which are best adapted to the environmental conditions of soil and climate. The vine, which before the French occupation it can be said was not cultivated, as in all countries subject to Islamic domination, introduced after the proclamation of the protectorate and rapidly developed for the same reasons as in Algeria, is particularly cared for by established Sicilian farmers. in the Cape Bon peninsula (Grombalia). The area of ​​the vineyards, in continuous progress, exceeds 35,000 ha. The production of wine touches you one million hl. (just 1 introduced after the proclamation of the protectorate and rapidly developed for the same reasons as in Algeria, it is particularly cared for by Sicilian farmers established in the Cape Bon peninsula (Grombalia). The area of ​​the vineyards, in continuous progress, exceeds 35,000 ha. The production of wine touches you one million hl. (just1 introduced after the proclamation of the protectorate and rapidly developed for the same reasons as in Algeria, it is particularly cared for by Sicilian farmers established in the Cape Bon peninsula (Grombalia). The area of ​​the vineyards, in continuous progress, exceeds 35,000 ha. The production of wine touches you one million hl. (just 1/ 5 than that of Tuscany). The wine produced, very colorful and with a high alcohol content, is for the most part exported to France as a blending wine. Furthermore, the vine is not cultivated only for the production of wine, but also – and especially for the care of indigenous farmers – for the production of table grapes, of which it produces for 50-60 thousand q. An eminently Mediterranean country, Tunisia offers all the most favorable conditions for the cultivation of the olive tree, which boasts ancient traditions. For Tunisia 2016, please check softwareleverage.org.

The state of general decadence that the Beylicate presented before the occupation like the other Barbary states had greatly deteriorated this rich crop, so that the olive groves appeared to have been converted into uncultivated scrubs and real forests. Some improvement had begun to be practiced by the government of the regency; the rebirth was the work of the new rulers, who dedicated a lot of attention to it, transforming the ancient olive groves and planting new ones with rational systems. Today in Tunisia there are over 10 million olive trees in full production, so that the oil harvest now exceeds 350,000 q., More than triple the production in Tuscany. The Tunisian region that is best suited to olive cultivation is the Sahel; and Sfax is its main collection and export market. Other arboreal plants that bear fruit are carob and almond trees, the production of which is respectively 17,000 and 16,000 quintals. Moreover, the date palms have greater importance, with very valuable fruits in European markets, of which there are about two and a half million; they especially abound in the Chotts region and supply for 350,000 q. of dates per year. On the other hand, citrus fruits (oranges and lemons) are of limited importance, whose total production does not reach 30,000 q., Equal to less than 1/15 of that of Sicily. A product of spontaneous vegetation that represents a not despicable contribution to the indigenous economy of Tunisia is alpha, which, like in other Mediterranean African countries, covers the semi-arid flat lands of Tunisia; whose collection, free to all, through quite considerable fluctuations is constantly growing. The export of alpha to England, which almost completely absorbs it, reached 865,000 q in 1931. for a value of 30 million francs. The forest that, as we have seen, it covers the slopes of the highest elevations of the regions most benefited by the rains, occupying an area of ​​one million hectares; but only a quarter, perhaps, can truly qualify as tall forest, while the rest would rather qualify as scrubland. The predominant species are cork oak, Lusitanian oak, holm oak, Aleppo pine. The property is state-owned and the state is waiting for the conservation and extension work, drawing significant benefits (over 4 million francs in 1931). The predominant species are cork oak, Lusitanian oak, holm oak, Aleppo pine. The property is state-owned and the state is waiting for the conservation and extension work, drawing significant benefits (over 4 million francs in 1931). The predominant species are cork oak, Lusitanian oak, holm oak, Aleppo pine. The property is state-owned and the state is waiting for the conservation and extension work, drawing significant benefits (over 4 million francs in 1931).

Even more than agriculture, the breeding of livestock constitutes the main occupation of the natives and their greatest resource, although the methods used and the care that are brought to them are still quite primitive. The livestock patrimony of the regency rises to 448,671 cattle (of which 50,000 owned by Europeans), 1,941,000 sheep (138,684 by Europeans), 1,710,000 goats (30,650 by Europeans), 23,850 pigs (all European-owned), 93,800 horses (9400 of Europeans), 47,000 mules, 172,000 donkeys and 148,000 camels, almost exclusively owned by the natives. Poultry farming is quite widespread, both among the natives and the European settlers.

Tunisia Agriculture